Checking for uncommited git changes in a batch program

July 22, 2020 batch, git

Sometimes it's helpful to exit out of a batch script if there are pending changes to a repo. This is done in batch script in a non intuitive way.

@ECHO OFF
PUSHD %~dp0

SET __HAS_CHANGES=0

REM The loop won't be executed if 'git status -s' doesn't produce any output.
FOR /f "tokens=*" %%i IN ('git status -s') DO ( SET __HAS_CHANGES=1 )

REM Check if the loop was executed and goto EXIT if it was.
IF "%__HAS_CHANGES%" NEQ "0" (
    ECHO There are currently uncommitted changes.
    GOTO EXIT
)

REM Do the work you want to do here.

:EXIT
POPD

Enum Extension Methods

July 17, 2020 c#, enum, extension

Did you know you can create extension methods for enums?

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Disable C# null checks for a field or property

January 02, 2020 c#, nrt, nullable

The new nullable reference types in C# are great but sometimes you might need to disable it for a single field or property. You can do that by assigning the value to null and using the ! operator.

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Use nameof() to set a string variable to its name

December 17, 2019 c#, nameof()

This is one of those things that should have just been obvious to me but once I saw it I wondered why I had never thought to use it myself. nameof() can be used when declaring a variable to set the value of the variable to the name of the variable:

public const string MyVariable1 = nameof(MyVariable1); public static void Main() { Console.WriteLine(MyVariable1); }
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Dynamically loaded DLL thows AccessViolationException on first function call

October 22, 2019 c#, LoadLibrary, GetProcAddress

In my library GLESDotNet I load the libegl.dll and libglesv2.dll DLLs dynamically via the Win32 functions LoadLibrary and GetProcAddress. I already had everything working via DLLImport but I wanted to be able to load the DLLs from different subdirectories depending on the architecture.

For the first test I only loaded the libegl.dll DLL before moving on to the libglesv2.dll. I made the classic programmer mistake of changing too much at one time. The first call to any function in libegl.dll resulted in an AccessViolationException. I couldn't figure out what was going wrong so I decided to revert my changes and try again.

I noticed that when the DLLs were in the same directory the AccessViolationException went away. Changing the working directory to the directory of the DLLs also solved the problem once the DLLs were placed in subdirectories again. This led me to believe that loading libegl.dll must be implicitly loading libglesv2.dll. Loading libglesv2.dll via LoadLibrary along with libegl.dll solved the problem.